Illinois Education & Technology Conference

For 29 years, IETC has focused on leading the conversation around technology integration, engaging instructional practices, and emerging trends.

This year, we’re committed to continuing those conversations at a brand-new location that will help Midwest educators like you build the present and future of educational technology – together. At the heart of our event, we focus on technology integration strategies, engaging instructional practices, digital tools and resources, and emerging trends. In other words, IETC is the best place to learn about both the present and future of educational technology.

AA #3853 Framework for Successful Technology Integration in Schools ROE 28

Districts that have success with technology integration have done so through planning and alignment to district goals. To ensure consistency and equity throughout classrooms, it is important to implement a technology framework that aligns with district goals and allows teachers to integrate technology at the stage they are most comfortable at.

This academy introduces participants to several research-based frameworks that are used with technology integration: SAMR, TPACK, Triple E Framework, and the Four Shifts.

Participants will examine and assess each framework to determine which aligns with their district’s vision and mission. Participants will also be asked to confer with stakeholders to determine if a technology framework is needed and if so create a timeline for implementation which includes how staff will be trained in the framework adopted by the district. Participants should obtain access to their district School Improvement Plan prior to beginning the online academy.

Be Connected: Hacked, Attacked, and Pwned – Oh My!

This week on Be Connected, we’ll jump headlong into one of the chief concerns for all digitally-connected organizations (including schools) today – the threat of being hacked. In particular, we’ll look at the website www.haveibeenpwned.com and discuss how students and staff alike can use it to discover if their personal credentials have ever been hacked and dumped in a documented data breach.

Be Connected is a weekly webinar series from the LTC focused on facilitating open discussions about pertinent topics within Illinois’ edtech community. Hosted by the LTC’s Chris Wherley and Eric Muckensturm, each session will focus on a specific topic and provide space for participants to ask and answer questions in a relaxed, supportive environment.

Each week will feature a different core topic and a fresh opportunity to connect with your peers. So, be sure to check the LTC events calendar routinely so that you can join in the discussion and Be Connected.

Be Connected: NetRef Internet Bandwidth Report

Ensuring digital equity in our schools first requires knowing exactly what capabilities your institution does and does not possess. Join the LTC’s Chris Wherley as we discuss NetRef’s Internet Bandwidth Report, one of the best available resources for appraising your district’s digital capacity. NetRef’s Internet Bandwidth Report offers a detailed look at how your students are using the internet and allows you to allocate your resources based upon current standards and best practices for digital resource utilization.

Be Connected is a weekly webinar series from the LTC focused on facilitating open discussions about pertinent topics within Illinois’ edtech community. Hosted by the LTC’s Chris Wherley and Eric Muckensturm, each session will focus on a specific topic and provide space for participants to ask and answer questions in a relaxed, supportive environment.

Each week will feature a different core topic and a fresh opportunity to connect with your peers. So, be sure to check the LTC events calendar routinely so that you can join in the discussion and Be Connected.

Holly Pantle on the Role of Libraries and Technology

Holly Pantle is the incoming Technology Director for the Charleston (IL) school district. During much of her career, Holly spent time supporting students, teachers, and administrators as a Library Information Specialist. In this episode, Holly discusses the changing role of the Library Information Specialist, how she has supported students and teachers during remote learning, and some of the challenges she plans to tackle in her new role.

Contact Holly via email.

Podcast: Jodi Scott Discusses Remote Learning

Regional Superintendent Jodi Scott was part of the team that created the Illinois Remote Learning Recommendations. In this special episode, Jodi returns to our show to discuss the differences between Illinois’ current Remote Learning Recommendations and the earlier legislation. Listen as Jodi provides critical clarifications and insights. /p>

Connect with Jodi Scott:
Mail: jscott@roe33.net
Website: www.roe33.net
Twitter: @ROE33_HKMW

5 Tips for Leading Professional Learning Virtually

If you are a professional development provider like I am, you get into the profession to make a personal connection with people. There is nothing I enjoy more about my job than getting into a room with a group of educators and getting to know them in the often too short time that we are together. With the current reality of the situation we are living in, the prospect of getting back into a room with people seems a long way off. This means that many of us will have to shift toward delivering our content virtually via a platform like Zoom or Google Meet.

Leading professional development in this manner can be a challenge. It is much different than having everyone’s attention in one room. Teachers are probably at home, distracted by kids, pets, or spouses. As the presenter, it is up to us to make sure our delivery methods are enough to keep our audience engaged and learning with us. 

To that end, I have my five tips for leading professional learning online. I have had vast experience leading groups of educators through online training, and with that comes quite a few ups and downs. While the process is never as smooth as in-person delivery, these five tips can assist in making the experience better for you and your audience!

Outline of Tips in the Video

  1. Be prepared
    • Have your presentation ready and well prepared.
    • Have questions and discussion prompts available to start conversation with your audience.
    • Be prepared for silence, you might have to talk the whole time
    • If you are using Zoom and want discussion to occur, use the breakout room feature.
  2. Have your system set up for delivering quality content
    • Have your camera placed on an elevated surface or use a webcam that is eye level.
    • Have a quality microphone, this might not mean headphones, some of those mics are worse that the one on your computer! Test your audio quality with someone ahead of your presentation.
    • Be in a room with good lighting so people can see you better.
    • Turn off your notifications on your computer and phone. These can be distracting to you and your audience.
    • If possible use two monitors, or at least a second device like an iPad. This can be helpful in looking up information while your presentation is on the screen.
  3. If possible, have a co-host
    • They are great for assisting in moderating the chat for you.
    • They can listen more closely to discussions for things you might have missed.
    • They are helpful to talk to in times of silence.
    • When the session is over they are someone to debrief with.
  4. Know Your Platform
    • Whether it is Zoom, Google Meet, or something else understand it’s basic features
    • Know how to share joining information with audience members that are attempting to join late
    • Know how to start and moderate the chat
    • Sharing your screen is of utmost importance. You will most likely have a presentation, make sure people can see it.
    • Know how to mute your rouge audience microphones. It might not be their fault but mics turn on sometimes, know how to shut them off.
  5. Have empathy for your participants
    • Don’t force them to sit and listen for long periods of time, keep sessions reasonably short and give breaks if needed.
    • This is a new experience for many, if they leave their mic on don’t be mad about it, understand they didn’t mean to interrupt you.
    • Silence from the group doesn’t mean they don’t understand, sometimes silence is just how video instruction goes.

Learning Tours: Seeing Change In Action

“This sounds great, but what does it look like in action?” This question is often asked at professional learning events by administrators, teachers, or coaches. For many in education, seeing is believing and school visits can be one of the best forms of professional learning for all educators. 

Site visits allow educators, especially those responsible for leading change, with the opportunity to learn from others who have navigated the challenge already. School site visits provide three major benefits to all educators.

  1. Learn from Experience
    The best way to find out how to embark on a new path is to hear from someone who has already walked it. Site visits provide educators the opportunity to hear the lessons learned from those who have led the change. Instead of attending a workshop or a conference and hearing theoretical ideas, visitors learn directly from those who experienced the challenges and successes and how they approached the change from the start.
  2. Learn What Will Work, What Might Not, and What to Consider
    It’s an obvious statement that no two districts are the same, which can also be said about leading change in different districts. Site visits provide educators the ability to see multiple approaches to similar ideas. For this reason, it is important to visit a variety of schools that have embarked upon a similar change. Doing so will provide educators numerous ideas on how to lead the change in their district. Some ideas may be replicable, others may not. Some site visits may provide ideas for possibilities not yet considered.
  3. Connect and Collaborate
    Learning from peers does not, nor should stop after the site visit. As educators begin the change process, they have the opportunity to stay in touch and ask questions from peers along the way. These connections can also lead to future collaboration opportunities and relationships in the future as well.

LTC Learning Tours

The Learning Technology Center’s Learning Tours are an opportunity for educators and district leaders to visit other districts in order to experience innovative, best practices in learning space design, digital learning tools, 1:1 implementation, personalized learning, and more. The districts hosting Learning Tours drive the agenda, showcasing everything from instructional practices, resource adoption, infrastructure, community partnerships, use of space and time, physical security, and culture.

Be a Part of the First Learning Tour

On October 18, 2019, the Learning Technology Center and Yorkville Community Unit School District 115 and present the first Learning Tour, focusing on Redesigning Learning Spaces. Attendees will learn from district and school administrators on the learning space design process. A panel discussion will provide participants the opportunity to hear from teachers and students about the spaces, as well as ask questions. The tour will include Project Lead the Way rooms, Learning Stairs and Library, and student collaboration spaces throughout the high school. An optional tour of the Center for Innovation at the District Office will be available at the conclusion of the high school tour.

Yorkville Learning Tour Information
October 18, 2019
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Focus: Redesigning Learning Spaces
Cost: FREE

For more information about the Yorkville Learning Tour or to register for the event, please visit ltcillinois.org/learningtours.

Host a Learning Tour

We are looking to partner with schools across the state and showcase instructional practices, resource adoption, infrastructure, community partnerships, use of space and time, physical security, and culture.. To find out how your school can host a Learning Tour, visit ltcillinois.org/learningtours for more information or to complete the online application.