Responsible Decision Making: Digital Citizenship and Online Safety

Join us to learn how digital citizenship and online safety play a role in the school ecosystem. In particular, we’ll focus in how educators can help create and maintain positive online experiences for all learners. This session will also demonstrate examples of how digital citizenship and online safety can be integrated into classrooms to create positive life long habits for all students.

AA #3779 Digital Citizenship in Action ROE 28

In this course, leaders will learn about the history and current state of digital citizenship education. Leaders will then critically evaluate the explicit, implicit, and null curriculum around digital citizenship in their schools. Throughout the course, participants will dive deep into each of the six competencies of a digital citizen by growing in their own competency knowledge, examining resources to bring into their schools, and considering how each competency can be further supported. Leaders will finish the course by developing an action plan to improve digital citizenship education that addresses immediate, short-term, and long-term goals.

Digital Safety for Littles

By age eight, 90% of children have experience with the internet. As such, digital safety training must begin early. Using videos, music, children’s books, games and more, this session will explore practical resources for password protection, digital footprints, oversharing, social media, internet etiquette, and cyber-bullying for K-4 teachers.

After attending this session, attendees will return to their schools with eight, 30-minute digital safety lessons that are age-appropriate for today’s youngest learners. Each complete lesson includes a combination of digital and analogue resources including games, videos, children’s books and assessments suitable for both in-class or remote learning.

Responsible Decision Making: Digital Citizenship and Online Safety

Join us to learn how digital citizenship and online safety play a role in the school ecosystem. In particular, we’ll focus in how educators can help create and maintain positive online experiences for all learners. This session will also demonstrate examples of how digital citizenship and online safety can be integrated into classrooms to create positive life long habits for all students.

Google’s Be Internet Awesome: Helping Kids Become Safe, Confident Digital Explorers

Google believes that all students should have an opportunity to meaningfully engage with technical skills of the future, because students today need basic digital literacy skills to be successful in any career, in any field.

In 2017, Google launched Be Internet Awesome, a free program designed to provide the resources to help educators teach students about digital safety and citizenship. Join Google for Education Program Manager Anne Nash to learn more about Be Internet Awesome and how you can bring this content to your classrooms, students, and families – including through their Pear Deck-enabled BIA interactive lessons!

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility: Digital Citizenship Resources for Connected Kids

Digital Citizenship Week begins October 18th. Are you ready to participate in this annual recommitment to fostering digitally-competent students? Join Nicole Zumpano as she shares a variety of resources crowdsourced by the LTC’s team of Instructional Technology Coaches to help you integrate this important topic into your classrooms. You’re sure to walk away with ideas that can be implemented during this important awareness week and beyond.

Digital Citizenship for Littles

Interested in teaching digital citizenship skills and habits to your youngest students? Join us to learn about some resources you can utilize to reach this goal in your K-5 classroom.

AA #3779: Digital Citizenship in Action

In this course, leaders will learn about the history and current state of digital citizenship education. Leaders will then critically evaluate the explicit, implicit, and null curriculum around digital citizenship in their schools. Throughout the course, participants will dive deep into each of the six competencies of a digital citizen by growing in their own competency knowledge, examining resources to bring into their schools, and considering how each competency can be further supported. Leaders will finish the course by developing an action plan to improve digital citizenship education that addresses immediate, short-term, and long-term goals.

This course will take 6 hours to complete with a one hour break for lunch. Completion of this workshop will result in 1 AA credit or 6 PD Hours.

5 Things Students Should Do to Stay Safe and Secure Online

Note: This article was originally published by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) on February 5, 2021. It has been republished here with their permission, and the permission of the author. You can read the original here.

Today is Safer Internet Day, an occasion to recommit to best practices for protecting digital identity. In the spirit of this important celebration, we’re proud to feature an article by the LTC’s Nicole Zumpano, originally published by ISTE. Each of its timely resources and recommendation will help you make digital literacy and internet safety a cornerstone of your classroom year-round.


As adults, we do everything possible to keep our computers, bank accounts and families safe. Our list of to-dos continues to grow as our use of digital technologies increases. While these tasks are rote to most adults, we can’t expect that our students will follow our lead.  

It is our responsibility as educators to make sure learners know how to do more than surf the web and consume media. All educators — from classroom teachers to technology coaches and school administrators — should lead the discussion on digital literacy. Here are some ways to make sure our students stay safe and secure online:

Teach students to conduct data mines (on themselves)

Students should do this every 3-6 months. While many will Google their names, we need to teach them to dig deeper. Here are some general guidelines to follow:

  • Log out of internet browsers before searching (staying logged in can affect the results).
  • Search (using quotation marks) full legal names, nicknames and usernames.
  • Search Google Images with names/usernames.
  • Use multiple browsers, such as Chrome, Bing, Yahoo, Safari and Firefox.
  • Look beyond the first page of results. Go at least five pages deep until the name/username no longer appears. Take note of what kind of results appear (presentations/social media/images/etc.).

Here’s an exercise I give to graduate students, but it can easily be replicated for high school students.

Check privacy settings on social media accounts

Because many sites may be blocked during school hours, allow students to check privacy settings on those that are not. At a minimum, show students how to access privacy settings (perhaps through a screencast or screenshot). On each social media site, students should:

  • Check privacy settings to see who can view posts.
  • Go through “friends” lists and remove people who should not be there.
  • Search posts and remove any that they wouldn’t want a parent, teacher, employer or college official to see.
  • Look at tagged images that others have posted.  

Watch the video below to seen how Katrina Traylor Rice taught students about digital privacy while teaching a unit on the Bill of Rights.

Teach digital literacies

Digital literacy is a term that has many moving parts. Students need guidance on varying types of literacy, including media (how to “read” media), social (how to interact in an online environment), and information (the ability to locate, evaluate and properly use information).

Safety falls into this category as well. Students need to know, understand and apply password algorithms as well as recognize scams and understand how their data is being tracked and used by companies.

Stress the importance of digital maintenance

This is the spelling list or cursive practice of the digital world. It’s not glamorous to teach but essential for students to know:

  • Teach students how to download Google Drive files to an external drive.
  • Remind them to backup Drive files, important emails, smartphone photos/apps/etc. at least once a month.
  • Make sure parents have access to account passwords in the event of emergencies. Have them write the accounts/passwords on a piece of paper and place it in an envelope in a safe yet visible place.
  • Reiterate the importance of logging out of accounts, not simply closing the browser window.

Start early

Teaching digital responsibility is not just for middle school teachers or library media specialists. It’s everyone’s duty, and we must start with kindergartners. Consider developing a digital media scope-and-sequence to address what should be taught at each grade.

This is something that can be developed by teachers, students and parents alike. At a minimum, make a commitment with grade-level colleagues that you’ll help teach students how to be safe and secure digital citizens. A good place to begin is by reviewing the ISTE Standards for Students.

Being alert — being aware of online actions, and knowing how to be safe and create safe spaces for others online — is one of the five competencies of the #DigCitCommit campaign. Watch the video below to learn how you can get involved in the movement.

Growing Up in a Digital Age: Understanding Gen Z Students

Digital Citizenship week may have just passed, but there is still time to help our students become responsible citizens. Nicole Zumpano explores the mindset of Generation Z students, focusing specifically on what research says about their interactions with the digital world.