Data and Security Summit

Doug Levin, the CEO and Founder of EdTech Strategies, kicked off the event by sharing his work tracking publicly school cybersecurity incidents as part of the K-12 Cyber Incident Map, driving home the point that schools across the county, including Illinois, are dealing with cybersecurity incidents.

Breakout sessions and whole group conversations throughout the day were facilitated by Ross Lemke, the Director of the U.S. Department of Education’s Privacy and Technical Assistance Center; Chris Hill, the Chief Information Security Officer for the Illinois Department of Innovation and Technology; and Chris Wherley, the Learning Technology Center’s Network and Technology Services Coordinator.

As the day progressed, common themes surfaced in many sessions: school districts are vulnerable, communication and planning is essential, and security is a shared responsibility between all district leaders and not just the technology staff.

In case you missed the events, here are the presentations and resources:

Among our favorite tools referenced are:

Illinois Student Privacy Alliance

link to access Illinois Student Privacy Alliance pageLink to request a district account for Illinois Student Privacy Alliance

ISPA Office Hours
Every Thursday in March (7th, 14th, 21st, 28th)
Time: 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Location: Zoom Meeting Room
Getting Started information as well as get your questions answered.

The Learning Technology Center (LTC) formed the Illinois Student Privacy Alliance (ISPA) in partnership with the Access 4 Learning Community’s Student Data Privacy Consortium (SDPC). SDPC is a national collaborative of schools, districts, and state agencies that are working together to address growing student data privacy concerns by developing real-world, adaptable, and implementable solutions. The goal of the ISPA is to set standards of both practice and expectations around student privacy such that all parties involved have a common understanding of expectations. The LTC’s creation of ISPA also means that all PK-12 districts in Illinois are now able to use the resources provided by the SPDC without additional cost to the district.

The free membership to ISPA includes:

  • A statewide agreement that districts can use to ensure that the vendor is aware of and complies with Illinois’ student data privacy laws;
  • A searchable database of applications and vendors who have signed the statewide agreement with at least one school or district;
  • Full access to a clearinghouse of research and privacy effective practices; use cases and technical assistance guides; audit processes, checklists, and tools support;
  • Data governance and management modeling, and communities of practice between and among consortium members; and
  • Access to a community of schools, districts, states and marketplace providers dealing with the same issues you are.

More information on ISPA and SDPC is available at https://sdpc.a4l.org/view_alliance.php?state=IL. To join, visit https://sdpc.a4l.org/add_district_account.php?state=IL. Questions can be directed to Chris Wherley at cwherley@ltcillinois.org.

State Board to host Q&A events on new flexibility for school districts to define instructional days

The following press release originally appeared on the Illinois State Board of Education website on November 20, 2018.

SPRINGFIELD – School districts in Illinois now have maximum flexibility to define instructional days based on what will improve outcomes for students. The Illinois State Board of Education will host a series of public Q&A events for educators, parents, families, and school and district leaders to ask questions and share successes and challenges in using this flexibility afforded in state law.

Public Act 100-0465, also known as the Evidence-Based Funding for Student Success Act, made sweeping changes to education funding in Illinois when it became law on Aug. 31, 2017. The law changed the basis of state funding to student enrollment, rather than attendance. The act resulted in the sunsetting of Section 18-8.05 of the School Code, which had defined a day of attendance as a minimum of five instructional hours. Funding schools based on enrollment provides school districts the resources and flexibility to support all students, especially those most in need of support to access educational opportunities.

Students learn in a variety of ways and settings. ISBE encourages districts, school boards, and collective bargaining units to work together to innovate new ways of teaching and learning that center on competencies and mastery of subject matter – anywhere and anytime.

ISBE released guidance, available at https://www.isbe.net/Documents/Instructional-Day-Memorandum.pdf, on Nov. 9 to assist school districts in using this flexibility.

WHAT: Opportunity for educators, parents, families, and school and district leaders to ask questions of ISBE and share successes and challenges in locally defining an instructional day, based on what will improve student outcomes
WHO: Hosted by ISBE Acting Chief Education Officer Ralph Grimm, other ISBE executive staff, and local regional superintendents
 

WHEN/
WHERE:

All events 4-6 p.m.

  • Dec. 3 at Rooney Elementary School, 4900 Columbus Road, Quincy
  • Dec. 4 at Carbondale High School, 1301 E. Walnut Street, Carbondale
  • Dec. 5 at Silas Willard Elementary School, 460 Fifer Street, Galesburg
  • Dec. 6 at DuPage County Regional Office of Education, 421 N. County Farm Road, Wheaton
  • Dec. 10 at Williams Elementary, 1901 S. Ninth Street, Mattoon